After being acquired by Lawrence Herbert, a former printing company employee, Pantone developed into the leading color expert it is today. In 1963, the company developed the Pantone Matching System, a sort of “color standard” that assigns a serial number to every conceivable shade within each family of colors. For example, the designers might fail to use a certain gray that they wanted, due to the monitor or printing conditions,— but if they all use the same serial number associated with a specific Pantone color chip, they can all achieve the same gray. Recognizing the need for perfect color agreement—for the ability to render a color in such a way that it is not influenced or altered by the surrounding environment—industry experts have likened Pantone’s system to a universal language. Quite frankly, Pantone’s current products do not appeal to the average consumer. That’s because they are designed for professional use; it is rare to meet someone outside the graphic design field who is familiar with Pantone. Unsatisfied with the status quo, however, the people at Pantone are seeking to collaborate with other brands to develop products for everyday use.

After being acquired by Lawrence Herbert, a former printing company employee, Pantone developed into the leading color expert it is today. In 1963, the company developed the Pantone Matching System, a sort of “color standard” that assigns a serial number to every conceivable shade within each family of colors. For example, the designers might fail to use a certain gray that they wanted, due to the monitor or printing conditions,— but if they all use the same serial number associated with a specific Pantone color chip, they can all achieve the same gray. Recognizing the need for perfect color agreement—for the ability to render a color in such a way that it is not influenced or altered by the surrounding environment—industry experts have likened Pantone’s system to a universal language. Quite frankly, Pantone’s current products do not appeal to the average consumer. That’s because they are designed for professional use; it is rare to meet someone outside the graphic design field who is familiar with Pantone. Unsatisfied with the status quo, however, the people at Pantone are seeking to collaborate with other brands to develop products for everyday use.

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