This month, we are introducing Diptyque, a French fragrance brand. Diptyque started in 1961 as a small fabric shop, but as it expanded into scented candles, the brand established itself as a fragrance brand. This seems like another coincidence, but the founders of Diptyque weren’t experts in that specific area. Diptyque’s main focus is to capture and reinterpret the scents of memorable places and travel destinations, and to do this while maintaining the brand’s own concept and perspective without being carried away by the changes in the world. Diptyque seems to be the only fragrance brand that has created a series of sub-brands underneath the Diptyque umbrella. The unique label on each Diptyque perfume represents each fragrance’s story and individual character.

In general, it’s probably impossible for us to distinguish all the fragrance products in the world. But we can distinguish the stories behind fragrance brands. The first step in learning about a fragrance brand’s philosophy is to see if it was named after a fashion brand or the product of a wide-ranging imagination. As we discuss in this issue of B, it’s not unusual for brands to interpret the same scent—rose, perhaps—in different ways.

This month, we are introducing Diptyque, a French fragrance brand. Diptyque started in 1961 as a small fabric shop, but as it expanded into scented candles, the brand established itself as a fragrance brand. This seems like another coincidence, but the founders of Diptyque weren’t experts in that specific area. Diptyque’s main focus is to capture and reinterpret the scents of memorable places and travel destinations, and to do this while maintaining the brand’s own concept and perspective without being carried away by the changes in the world. Diptyque seems to be the only fragrance brand that has created a series of sub-brands underneath the Diptyque umbrella. The unique label on each Diptyque perfume represents each fragrance’s story and individual character.

In general, it’s probably impossible for us to distinguish all the fragrance products in the world. But we can distinguish the stories behind fragrance brands. The first step in learning about a fragrance brand’s philosophy is to see if it was named after a fashion brand or the product of a wide-ranging imagination. As we discuss in this issue of B, it’s not unusual for brands to interpret the same scent—rose, perhaps—in different ways.

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